Posts tagged Stripped
How to Write Serials: Pricing

How to Write Serials One of the magic ingredients of serials is pricing. It's magic because the pricing is what allows readers to find you, but it is also magic because of all the options it provides you. When you're writing a single novel you only have one product to work with, and you likely only have a little wiggle room in the pricing of that single product. But over the course of writing a serial you instantly create a small backlist that gives you a few more options for testing your market, finding your audience, and learning where your sweet spot lies.

For someone brand new to the industry or still building a customer base, 99 cents and free are your best friends.

99 cents is low entry point for readers. If you have a great cover, gripping blurb, and fantastic first few pages, then you are likely to start selling a few copies, even without any fan base. Most readers are happy to pony up 99 cents for something new and exciting. Plus, once you get the first three books in your serial out you can lower the price of your first book to FREE! And free can be magical.

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There are a lot of marketing options out there for free books. Even using the hashtag #FREE (and combo that with #iBooks or #Kindle) on Twitter will grab you a few eyeballs. If you combine that with some inexpensive advertising and politely ask some relevant blogs on Facebook to post your freebie then you can start to generate some buzz!

Why is free magical?

It sucks in new readers, helps build reviews, and your mailing list. Free books get more reviews because they get in front of more eyeballs. More reviews means more options for paid advertising. It also makes you look good! But the real gold mine is in building your email list. Put a link in the back of your book asking readers to signup for your mailing list to get an alert when the next book in the serial releases. Facebook comes and goes, advertisers decide who makes the cut, but everyone who subscribes to your newsletter sees what you send out. My biggest jumps in sales are always after a newsletter goes out announcing a new release and my biggest signup point is the back of my first free book in a serial.

And by the time Book 5 comes out you've got a nice little fan base going. I recommend going wide to all the retailers (unless you don't have the time/energy.) Release to all retailers and make Book 1 permafree until sales taper. When your sales taper off is the time to reevaluate your sales strategy, reprice your books and your bundle.

Here's what my pricing strategy looks like:

Book 1: 99c/Free (when book 3 releases)

Book 2: 99c

Book 3: 99c

Book 4: 99c/$1.99 (after the series is complete)

Book 5: 99c/2.99 (after the series is complete)

Box set: 3.99

I play with my prices all the time. For a while I actually put my Tease series in KU (due to family issues I didn't have the time or energy to keep up with all the retailers and sales strategy. For six months I focused solely on Amazon.)

Kindle Unlimited did affect my pricing strategy, but I was surprised by how successful it was. Even with the first book at 99 cents instead of free, readers kept picking it up! Instead of buying each book individually (because I had raised the price of every book in the series) they purchased the box set. The box set looked like a really great deal since buying the series one at a time wound up costing close to $10. The series also did well with Kindle Unlimited readers. Not so well that I stayed with KU, but for the circumstances we were in at the time, it was a very effective change for my serial.

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And that's what I want you all to keep in mind. There is no single formula for success. Don't be afraid to change things up. Follow your gut instincts and keep in mind that your readers come first.

Pricing is one of your biggest assets in serial writing. The flexibility, options, and strategy give you so much to work with in a short period of time. In my next post I'll be discussing the writing process and how to schedule your serial. You can also check in tonight on First Draught! The entire show is dedicated to serials! You can find the links and information on the First Draught website!

You can also check out my other serial posts Format and Strategy.

How To Write Serials: Strategy

How to Write Serials When it comes to strategy with romance serials it's all about the numbers.

Who is your target audience, how hot are you writing, what do you want to charge, and how many words are you willing to invest into your cause? The kinkier you write, the less words you have to write, and the higher you can charge (because erotica is considered a high demand genre with a thirst for very specific content.) 

But the hotter you write, the more you run into advertising and visibility issues because many places will not promote explicit content. If you're like me, you write very hot and use certain four-letter words. So be conscious of what you're writing and what opportunities that will afford you (and which doors that will close.) 

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In general, 15k words for $0.99 is a sweet spot. When you write shorter, readers b*tch about paying for your words (unless they are super hot addictive words. For instance, straight up erotica can go as short as 4k words as long as it's kinky.) If you write too much longer than 15k words then you aren't maximizing your cost/word ratio (unless you are charging 2.99.) While we all love to write, we also love to put food on our tables. Don't spend a lot of time writing words you can't charge for. The point is to put out a fun, exciting, sexy product, but to also maximize your earning potential.

Keep your first episode on the shorter end. It is your hook episode and the one you'll want to make permafree (depending on sales strategy). With Tease I made each episode a couple thousand words longer hoping to unconsciously make readers feel more and more satisfied, and giving me the option to charge more for later editions. Readers definitely felt satisfied, but I found that I was reluctant to charge more for later editions, which made my extra work kind of pointless. And by extra effort, it was almost doubling my turnaround time by episode 5.

By the way, I *always* look like Jessica Alba in the bedroom. Always.

And when you think about it, going back to the TV strategy, every episode is the same length except for season finales or specials. So I now try to keep each episode in the 15-18k word range. Five episodes is a good format for two reasons: 1...it winds up being approximately the same length as a full novel which gives you more strategy options down the road. And 2...when you bundle them up at the end, it gives you the ability to charge a reasonable amount for your work. 

What do I mean by that? Well, if you write a three book serial and the first book is free, but you're only charging $0.99 for each of the next two books then your entire series can be bought for $1.98. That doesn't give you much power to price the box set at different levels unless you start playing around with prices.

Which brings us to pricing! Stop back for my next post where I'll talk about pricing strategies and why they work. If you haven't, please be sure to read my first post on How to Write Serials: Format. In that post I discuss the basics of the serial format and how to plan out your writing strategy. 


Have you checked out my latest serial? Tempt was just the featured excerpt of the week over at Cosmopolitan.com!

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It was amazing timing because you can read Tempt: Volume 1 for free from any retailer!

Amazon – Nook – iBooks – Kobo

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